Monday, November 03, 2014

Jim Murray, 2015 Whisky Bible and Why Scotch Whisky Sucks



There is always a good deal of chatter when Jim Murray releases his awards list ahead of the release of a new edition of his bible, surely the sometimes controversial choices he makes are no promotional accident...

Some of the best whiskies I was fortunate enough to taste in 2014 were from Japan, and I would agree that the Yamazaki Sherry Cask is a stunning whisky from one of the world’s greatest malt whisky-producing countries, but the Daily Mail’s (expected) sensational headline and Mr. Murray’s statements strike me as remarkably unfounded. That Scotch whisky has something to be “humiliated” about, that a perceived lack of innovation has hindered Scotch producers is near nonsense.

Scotch whisky is celebrated and esteemed as much for its diversity of flavour as for its adherence to traditional craftsmanship over its lengthy history but recent years have seen these traditions used in new ways, with innovation from barley to barrel to bottle across the industry, albeit within parameters. Interestingly, many of these innovations have been in turn praised and criticised by Mr. Murray over the past two decades, from 1994s praise of finishing to his 2008 critique of the practice.

Japanese whisky was founded on the traditions of Scotch whisky making over 90 years ago, and it could possibly be argued that Japan adheres even more to the traditional methods (wooden washbacks, direct firing stills, etc) than the average malt distillery in Scotland so I do question Murray’s implied praise of generalised Japanese “innovation” over just making really good whisky that he liked. After all, publishing a bible DOES NOT make him God; his awards are no more than reflections of one drinker's opinion. 

Since the mid-1980s, when the world saw its first Single Malt from Japan, Japanese whiskies have attracted acclaim. Since 2008, Japanese blends and malts have won major titles, most notably from the World Whisky Awards. This is not to say that Scotch has stopped winning these awards or top acclaim from writers, including Murray. Although Scotch has, until now, won his highest accolade in all but one edition of his bible, Murray has awarded more American whiskies in recent years than Japanese. It is no news that America and Japan make excellent whiskies. Not a great headline, though, and tough to sell newspapers or magazines with a headline like that, "Whiskies Being Made to High Standard Outside Scotland"

The assumption from Murray’s statements is that Japanese whisky has an edge on Scotch because of a stronger vision or wilder innovation; innovations like the highball campaign? No Age Statements? Local barley or local oak? There are precedents in Scotch in every case. So in what way is Japanese whisky’s success due to innovations that Scotch lacks? Zero. It is due to releasing top quality malt whiskies. To infer that this precludes the ongoing (and much longer-running) success of Scotch whisky is balderdash, but a great reminder that Jim Murray’s latest book is about to be released!

Finally, in case it has not been mentioned, Jim has a new book coming out next week. 


9 comments:

Gal Granov said...

hear hear.
could not have said it better.

Oliver Klimek said...

That's quite a pile of bullshit indeed, but in one point I have to agree with Jim Murray. Maybe my expectations have been too high, but there have been a lot of rather unexciting new Scotch whiskies in the past few years. Contrary to him, though, I wonder if this may be the result of too much innovation (read: wood experiments), while the Japanese keep doing what they have been doing so excellently, maing not only good, but beatiiful whisky.

Jason Debly said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jason Debly said...

Jim Murray's "Whisky Bible" provides reviews of 4,500 whiskies. It is not possible for him to do serious tasting notes of 4,500 whiskies. I suspect he has a staff or team of reviewers. For me, the whisky bible represents the McDonalds of whisky reviews.

Esanford said...

Well said, Dr! (and nice to have you back, albeit so briefly)

Anonymous said...

Nobody who has read Gal Granov's blog could possibly disagree with him.

Anonymous said...

I think both yourself and Oliver have made fair points here.

Think of it another way. Is there really that much difference between Murray and the seemingly endless hordes of whisky bloggers?

Both get provided with a steady stream of samples for latest batches and releases.

Both Share their thoughts through the medium of text for a wide audience.

Rinse. Repeat.

Murray gets cash from sales, bloggers keep open the flow of samples, merch and maybe the odd quid or two along the way through adsense etc.

Just some food for thought.

Jason Debly said...

Eh Anonymous,

I am a blogger and I do not accept free samples. And there are others like me too.

Yamazaki said...

Some of the best whiskies I was fortunate enough to taste in 2014 were from Japan, and I would agree that the Yamazaki Sherry Cask is a ... iyamazaki.blogspot.de